One of my wethers in surgery at WSU for UC
#11
So cute! What a good patient!  Smile Heart
Reply
#12
What a sweetie. Big horns for 20 months! I love the deep ridges!
Reply
#13
Its really good to hear he pulled through the surgery. Hopefully he lives a long healthy life.

I had the misfortune of being in your shoes and I opted out of surgical removal of the stones and had decided to put my string leader down. Deecon was 3 yrs old.

Please keep us informed on his health.

Perhaps cumulatively through all of our experiences we can develop a strategy to prevent UC.
Reply
#14
How's your fella doing? Did you find a lab to analyze the stones?
Reply
#15
They sedated him Wednesday and tried to do contrast imaging but couldn't get the dye to pass from either direction in the upper portion of the urethra so that pretty much tells them he is blocked in that location.

Second surgery is scheduled for Tuesday morning to use endoscopy to try to go in and pull the stone out through the bladder. They are consulting with their small animal specialists to put together the right sized instruments and come up with a solid game plan to have the best chance at successfully removing the stones without having to do a more invasive surgery. He is doing well, eating really good, taking his meds (they have discovered he'll take them in marshmallows now that he has caught on to their fig newton surprises). He is not drinking well at all so they are giving him Gatorade/water via syringe but they are keeping him well hydrated so he is ready to go into surgery. He loves his morning and evening walks and I think the staff is getting a little education on what we all know...that goats are amazing animals with distinct personalities that can be very sweet and loveable.

Hoping Tuesday's surgery is successful and we can get him home soon!
Reply
#16
(11-22-2020, 02:01 PM)Nanno Wrote: How's your fella doing? Did you find a lab to analyze the stones?
I just posted on his status.  He's doing okay but still blocked.  Hopefully they will get that cleared up on Tuesday. 
The stones were sent to University of Minnesota.  They are a little bit delayed but they are still taking and analyzing stones so hopefully we will know for sure within another week or so.  The vets are pretty sure they are calcium carbonate stones.
Reply
#17
I'm so sorry it wasn't a straightforward outcome from the get-go. I hope the second surgery goes well. I've had the same experience with vets who have worked with my goats--they are just amazed that goats are so smart and personable. People don't think of "livestock" animals as capable of being just as intelligent and human-oriented as the ones we keep for pets.

I started giving each of my boys a magnesium gummy every morning. They love them! And if it's true that magnesium keeps calcium in suspension so it can't form bladder stones, that is cheap and easy prevention! I read up on it and it's very difficult to overdose magnesium. Apparently they just pee out the excess without it affecting other organs--very similar to Vitamin B in that regard.
Reply
#18
Very interesting about the gummies. Hmmmmmmmmm.......
Time to visit Amazon
I don't drink beer, but if I did, I'd prefer Dos Equis.  Stay thirsty my friends!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)