Hawaii ferrel pack goat!!!!
#1
I just got back from Hawaii and was looking at the ferrel goats (Spanish goats) and thinking these guess are studs!!! They live in the Lava fields with very little water, crap food and never ending heat.  They are smaller in frame than my alpines but they sport some cool head gear.  If I ever moved to Hawaii I would live trap some of these little guys, demesticate then and tern then into packing machines.  Imagine if one of these things got some actual quality feed.  It would be awesome!!!


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#2
In a million years their descendants will either be the size of mice or the size of rhinos.
I don't drink beer, but if I did, I'd prefer Dos Equis.  Stay thirsty my friends!
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#3
I've heard good things about the Hawaiian feral goats. Saltphoenix is a forum member here and she lives in Hawaii. In fact, I hope she's ok with that volcano! I just now remembered that she's on the Big Island. I think her goats are either feral or half feral but I'm not sure.
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#4
(05-11-2018, 02:56 PM)Mike Wrote:   Imagine if one of these things got some actual quality feed.  It would be awesome!!!

or they would develop metabolic issues......
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Sabine from Germany
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#5
(05-11-2018, 09:04 PM)Sanhestar Wrote:
(05-11-2018, 02:56 PM)Mike Wrote:   Imagine if one of these things got some actual quality feed.  It would be awesome!!!

or they would develop metabolic issues......

Sanhestar,
Is there any science behind that?  I would guess that nature has provided these goats with the ability to eat a wide range of foods which has alowed goats to spead so easily all over the world.
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#6
yes, nature has provided all animals with the ability to adjust to a certain variety of habitats. Nonetheless there are limits to that adjustments when the changes are reversed too quickly.

You can find this in the many Native Breeds of horses that have adjusted to lean pastures. Put them onto "quality" pastures (whereas quality needs a closer definition) and you will see a rise in overweight and laminitis, followed by skin conditions, other hoof conditions and then the metabolic "crash down" of EMS and Cushing Syndrome.

Overfeed a goat and you will see laminitis, as well and also infection with clostridia bacteria (can't remember the English name for that). Push the young goats too fast with food and you will get joint and growth plate problems.
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Sabine from Germany
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#7
Well man, if I ever move to Hawaii, figure out how to legally and humany capture a couple little buck I will let you know how it turns out.  My money is they will be fine, but thanks for the info.  At some point all animals we consider to be domestic where wild so it must be possible.
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#8
Many of the captive-bred goats in Hawaii are recently descended from captured ferals, and some simply are ferals that have been brought back into captivity. I'm guessing you wouldn't have to capture a feral buckling. You could probably find a farmer who raises goats from the same bloodlines, but whose kids have been handled from birth. I'm not sure how much red tape there would be to ship from Hawaii to the continental U.S., but I imagine it wouldn't be too crazy. However, if you live up north, I imagine the change in climate might be harder on them than the change in diet. After generations in tropical heat, I don't know how well they'd adapt to snow.
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#9
I would only try Hawaiin goats out if I lived in Hawaii.  I think you are correct about the change in climate and airplane rides are really rough on animals.
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