nubian/saanen
#1
whats everyones opinion on nubian/saanen crosses for packing?
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#2
(10-24-2020, 05:47 PM)blubonnett Wrote: whats everyones opinion on nubian/saanen crosses for packing?
I had a Nubian/Saanen cross, a kid about 9 months old and I didn't have him very long due to his "Nubian" voice. He was colored more like a Nubian, but he had "airplane ears:" they stuck out like Saanans' but flopped on the ends like Nubians'. I didn't have him long enough to train/pack him, but he sure was a sturdy bugger. I think if the result of the cross took more after the temperament and voice of a Saanen rather than the stubbornness and wail of a Nubian, it might make for a good pack goat. 

Nubian or Saanen, the most important things are the bonding between you and your goat, and working out who's going to be King Goat!
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#3
Our star packgoat Finn is 1/2 Nubian, 1/4 Alpine and 1/4 Grade Saanen (in other words, the doe was registered "Native on Appearance" Saanen because she looked like one even though the owner wasn't sure of her lineage). So Finn is not exactly a Nubian/Saanen cross but he's the closest I have personal experience with and he's an amazing packgoat. A Nubian/Saanen cross should have very long legs, which I value in packgoats. Ideally it would inherit the Saanen's softer voice, straight back, and narrow wither but it would inherit its feet and legs from the Nubian side. Saanens often have very poor hoof and lower leg conformation while Nubians have better feet and legs than most Swiss breeds. Both Nubians and Saanens can be very laid back to the point of laziness so this would be something to watch out for. However, being laid back can be an excellent trait in a packgoat if it has a good work ethic. Airplane ears are almost a given and I personally think they are adorable. In the end it's going to come down to that individual goat's conformation and personality. The last thing you want is a loud, lazy packgoat with the Nubian's wide withers and dipped back and the Saanen's splayed, cracked hooves and weak pasterns. The thing with crosses is that you can either end up with the best traits from two very different breeds, or the worst traits of both so it's important to evaluate them closely on an individual basis.
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