Pack Buck?
#1
I have a three year old buck that I am thinking about starting for pack or cart work.  He is also my best breeding buck.  Can breeding bucks be used for packing, or would that be to hard on them and have a negative effect? 

Thanks!
Promoting Oberhasli, For The Love of The Breed
Proverbs 27:27
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#2
(12-12-2015, 01:40 PM)Onion-Creek-Oberhaslis Wrote: I have a three year old buck that I am thinking about starting for pack or cart work.  He is also my best breeding buck.  Can breeding bucks be used for packing, or would that be to hard on them and have a negative effect? 

Thanks!

Hello OCO
I have little experience with Buck goats.
But lots of experience with horse stallions and working them in Public.
Because of the nature of a buck goat from what I know, IF they are in RUT and there is a doe in heat you have a major problem.

I have used stallions and believe in "Working" Stallions under all kinds of work. But then with the right training and person handling the stallion they make a excellent working animal. But there are NO short cuts. You get a good working stallion from understanding each other.
I do NOT know goats well enough or your Buck well enough to make a statement. 
Working any STUD animal in public requires a much higher level of training "Obedience" and Experience on your part than any other animal you have ever worked.

Stick to Wethers or a dry nanny for working goats.

Baron Von Black Arabian Stallion competing in Cowboy Mounted Shooting 45 Colt SA Revolvers used and 10 rounds required to score.
He took me to a Championship as well as being a Excellent PR horse for the Arabian Breed.
Your Buck Goat will have that load on him to Represent your Farm and Breed in Public.
Take a Wether is my advice.
Happy Trails
hihobaron


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#3
The biggest down-side to using a buck for pack and cart work is the SMELL!! Even the gentlest buck is not a very fun companion animal, and it's embarrassing to introduce him to people and then have them get that stink all over their hands and clothes from petting. I took my young buckling, Finn, around in public his first year before we neutered him because I wanted to begin his training but I also needed him for breeding. He was very young so he wasn't terribly stinky yet, but I really had to warn people to touch at their own risk. The other problem was that if he really liked someone and became too friendly, he would send a powerful spray in their direction. Nothing was safe for a good 3-5 foot radius. Since they can spray so far and since they do it will little or no warning, it can be pretty hazardous.

Even if you never plan to have your working buck near the public, you're still going to run into the problem of having perpetually smelly, greasy equipment. Even when they're not in rut, bucks always have a musky aura, and that oil sticks in their hair forever. It will get all over your harness, panniers, and everything else. That smell is stubborn and I don't expect it would ever truly come out once the equipment was well used. So no, I wouldn't recommend using a buck. But if you decide to try it, certainly let us know how it goes!
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#4
You dont really want to use him as vigorously as you would a wethered pack goat but no reason why you couldnt. Come spring time just give him a few good baths and he should be scent free enough to use Smile
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S.E. Washington (Benton City)
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#5
Thanks for the response. My greatest concern was for his health and well being first. The Buck smell is not a problem for me. I have found that if they get 3-5 baths in the spring (after rut) with Scent-Away soap the smell is almost eliminated. I even tested it out on a non goat friend. She smelled nothing. Smile My main pack areas are the miles and miles of logging roads and trails behind my house, so no problem with running into people who might smell him. Wink
Promoting Oberhasli, For The Love of The Breed
Proverbs 27:27
Kids Available!
http://onioncreekoberhaslis.weebly.com
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#6
Good to know. I have an extremely handsome one-yr old nubian/lamancha (with pixie ears and an incredible head of hair) who I want to use for packing. He is such a gentleman and is great with the halter and lead and comes when called (even during his dinner). He rarely smells and is sweet as sugar.

I'm hoping to post pictures/videos of Walter soon, (I have tons) but my phone won't let me. Battery's getting too old.
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#7
I packed Brian all last year while he was still a buck.  As was said above he smelled and his saddle and halter where always gross.  Also my hands and pant legs where always extra nasty during long trips but he was fine.  He was nev3r aggresive tword me, my family or other hikers.


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